Blood Orange Marshmallows

Fudge, Bark, and Candy
January 8, 2016
Fudge, Bark, and Candy
January 8, 2016

Blood Orange Marshmallows

It’s citrus season, let’s celebrate with fluffy Blood Orange Marshmallows! Now that the holidays are over, it’s citrus season. I’m not just talking

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Blood Orange Marshmallows

It’s citrus season, let’s celebrate with fluffy Blood Orange Marshmallows!

It's citrus season, let's celebrate with fluffy Blood Orange Marshmallows!

Now that the holidays are over, it’s citrus season. I’m not just talking about lemons and lime– more like tangerines, pomelos, clementines, and blood oranges.

Citruses reign supreme in baking because they add much needed acidity to each dish. Without acid in your baked goods, whether from baking soda or meyer lemons, your treats will end up tasting one-noted and bland.

Speaking of bland, did you know there is a Bland County, Virginia? What an unfortunate name. 

It's citrus season, let's celebrate with fluffy Blood Orange Marshmallows!

These marshmallows are far from bland. They’re actually from Flavor City, USA.

What’s amazing is how well the blood orange taste comes out in the marshmallows. It doesn’t taste like a plain orange; there is more of a floral, red fruitiness to it.

Plus, the color. Aren’t you in love?!

It's citrus season, let's celebrate with fluffy Blood Orange Marshmallows!

These mallows would be perfect for a bachelorette party, Sunday brunch, or a baby shower. Or just because you like the color pink.

Happy weekend to all 🙂

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Blood Orange Marshmallows

5 from 1 reviews
  • Author: Sarah Fennel
  • Prep Time: 15 mins
  • Cook Time: 8 mins
  • Total Time: 23 mins
  • Yield: 30 large marshmallows 1x
  • Author: Sarah Fennel
  • Prep Time: 15 mins
  • Cook Time: 8 mins
  • Total Time: 23 mins
  • Yield: 30 large marshmallows 1x
Scale:
  • Author: Sarah Fennel
  • Prep Time: 15 mins
  • Cook Time: 8 mins
  • Total Time: 23 mins
  • Yield: 30 large marshmallows 1x

Ingredients

For the marshmallows

  • 1½ cups sugar
  • 1 cup corn syrup
  • 1 cup fresh squeezed blood orange juice (from about 4 blood oranges), strained
  • 3 packages (3/4 oz) gelatin
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • powdered sugar, for coating
  • red food coloring (optional)

Instructions

  1. Line a 9″x9″ baking pan with saran wrap. Sprinkle liberally with powdered sugar. Set aside.
  2. In a standing mixer with a whisk attachment, pour ½ cup blood orange juice and gelatin into bowl. Mix and allow for gelatin to “bloom” for at least 5 minutes.
  3. Combine sugar, corn syrup, salt, and remaining ½ cup blood orange juice in a medium saucepan. Attach a candy thermometer to the side of the bowl. Heat over medium heat, stirring with a heat-safe spatula. Once the sugar is dissolved, increase the heat and boil without stirring until the mixture reaches 240°F, about 8 minutes. If you don’t have a candy thermometer, just allow the mixture to boil for 8 minutes. Immediately remove from heat.
  4. Turn the standing mixer to low speed and slowly pour the sugar mixture into the bowl with the gelatin mixture. Once added, increase speed to high and whip for approximately 15 minutes, until the mixture becomes very thick and stiff. Add the vanilla extract in the last minute of whipping. To add a little more color to your mallows, whip in 2-3 drops of red food coloring.
  5. Pour mixture into prepared baking pan, smoothing the top with a spatula. Knock the pan on a counter to release any air bubbles from within the mixture. Sprinkle top with powdered sugar and cover with saran wrap. Allow to cool for at least 4 hours, then cut mallows to desired size, sprinkling each edge with more powdered sugar! (I made 30 mallows in 5 rows by 6 rows)

 

— STILL HUNGRY? —

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  1. Wow, I made these as one of my holiday baking projects, and dipped one end of several of them in chocolate for a beautiful dessert tray. Well, we had people over for a New Years Day firepit yesterday, and I pulled out the container with the remainer of them, and we toasted them over the fire, which brought out all of the amazing orange flavor in them – amazing, they were tasty the way they came out, but even better toasted and would be unreal on a dark chocolate s’more!

  2. How long do these last? Are they pretty much best immediately after the four hour cool time, or could I make them a day ahead of time?