homemade buttermilk biscuit in front of mixer

Guys. Boyfriend got me a KitchenAid for my birthday. It is hands down one of the best presents I’ve ever gotten. It’s baby blue and shiny and beautiful and I love it. Now. The problem arose when I got this King of Mixers, and texted my sister to tell her. “What are you going to make first?!” she asked. Oh jeeze. Oh jeeze oh jeeze oh jeeze.

Using your KitchenAid for the first time is like a toned down version of losing your virginity. It’s gotta be with someone (or something) that you like and you will want to remember. I told my sister I had no idea what to do. “BISCUITS,” she texted me. And I thought YES… biscuits!

It’s one of those things that you try to make on your own, but between cutting the butter into the dough ‘until it resembles cornmeal,’ (is this actually possible to do with your hands alone? if someone has successfully done it, please fill me in on your secret) and keeping the dough cold, I’ve never been able to make a good, flakey biscuit.

So I woke up the next morning and had my first KitchenAid escapade. After we ate all but three of these homemade buttermilk biscuits biscuits, boyfriend told me “OK, now I see what all the fuss is about. That thing is awesome.”

Tips on how to make biscuits

These homemade buttermilk biscuits are remarkably easy to make, so don’t panic (like I did) about making them for the first time. My top tip is to keep your mixer on a low speed the whole time so your biscuit dough doesn’t get overworked. Add the cubed butter into the dough in batches to help it process more easily.

Once the butter has been incorporated into the dry ingredients, attach the dough hook to your mixer and slowly add in the buttermilk. Mix until the dough comes together and then turn off the mixer. You never want to overwork biscuit dough!

To cut your biscuits, you can either use a cookie or biscuit cutter, or get creative with what you have on hand. You could use a small bowl as a guide and trace a knife around the edges, or use the top of a cocktail shaker to cut the biscuits. (Guess which method I used!).

Common buttermilk substitutes

If you don’t have any buttermilk on hand, there are a few substitutes you can use in this homemade biscuit recipe. You can use a combination of regular milk and vinegar or lemon juice instead (1 tablespoon of acid for every cup of milk). You can also try using plain, unsweetened yogurt in place of buttermilk or a mixture of cream of tartar and milk.

I only made these buttermilk biscuits using legit buttermilk though, so I’m not sure how these substitutes would affect this recipe!

Print

Buttermilk Biscuits

These homemade buttermilk biscuits take around 30 minutes to make and use no special ingredients. Top with jam, gravy, or butter and dig in!

  • Author: Sarah | Broma Bakery
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
Scale

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 8 tablespoons butter, cut into squares
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk
  • 1 egg, beaten

Instructions

Preheat your oven to 425ºF.

Using your stand mixer on low with the standard whisk attachment, combine flour, sugar, baking powder and salt together.

Turn mixer onto medium speed, then cut butter into mixture until it begins to look like cornmeal.

Switch out the whisk attachment for your dough hook attachment. Turn the mixer onto medium speed again, slowly adding in the buttermilk in 3 additions. Mix just until the dough comes together.

Take the dough from the hook and roll it onto a lightly floured surface. Using a rolling pin, spead the dough out until it is 1 inch in thickness. Cut the dough using a metal cookie cutter.

Place the dough onto a greased baking sheet, then brush with your beaten egg (this is optional, but will give the biscuits a shiny golden-brown top, so I always do it).

Bake for 15 minutes, or until your biscuits are golden brown on the top and slightly firm to the touch. Eat immediately with jam, eggs, cheese, on their own, whatever.

More easy breakfast recipes from Broma Bakery:

Coconut Cream Pie Chia Pudding

Anything but Basic Muffin Recipe (with 9 variations!) 

Raw Seedy Granola Bars

Blueberry Coconut Layered Smoothie

Overnight Cinnamon Raisin Pumpkin French Toast Bake

22 comments

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Aww yay!! Such a great present! And these biscuits are lovely 🙂

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That is one beautiful KitchenAid.

And I think we can all agree that if you don’t have a KitchenAid, you are no one.

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My boyfriend got me a standmixer a couple months ago and I definitely agree, it’s one of the best presents ever!! The first thing I ever made with mine was pretzel rolls and I don’t know if it was the recipe or the fact that they were the first thing to be made with my standmixer, but they were pretty much the best pretzel rolls ever!

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My husband bought me a Kitchenaid for my birthday too! And I absolutely love, love, love it. Made bread and butter yesterday. Used the buttermilk from the butter to make my buttermilk biscuits this morning and they were awesome!!

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I got one for Christmas. He got me the professional series 600. I’ve made these biscuits. Changed em a lil and made garlic cheese biscuits a couple cakes couple batches of cookies I love it

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Thanks, FINALLY! I can make biscuits. <3

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I’m a guy who is new to baking. This recipe looked newbie-friendly so I tried it. The biscuits came out so well I ate half of my first batch with butter. Thanks for this – very proud of myself 😉

Sarah | Broma Bakery
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So glad you enjoyed it, Mike! Let me know what you try next!

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WOW!!! Just finished making these to go with beef stew. These are beyond delicious and SO easy. Thank you for sharing this recipe, I have tried many others!

Sarah | Broma Bakery
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So glad you enjoyed, Jess. Keep on baking, and keep on letting me know what you think! Thank you!!

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Made these tonight with the beef barley soup. They are really good. Used vinegar and milk instead of buttermilk.

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This was my first attempt at biscuits. Mine were good but turned out a little dry. I followed the recipe to a T. Should I try adding more butter or more buttermilk next time? Also, approximately how many biscuits does this recipe make?

Sarah | Broma Bakery
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The dryness could be in part to the baking time, as well, I would try underbaking them next time! And this should make approximately 10-12 biscuits 🙂

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Would it be okay to cut the dough and leave it at room temperature or in the refrigerator for a couple of hours? Trying to have these hot out of the oven for a dinner party. Thanks!

Sarah | Broma Bakery
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Hi Danielle! You’ll want to cut the dough, then freeze it until ready to pop in the oven. Add 3-5 minutes to your bake time to compensate. Enjoy!!!

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These are in the oven now! So excited to try. Never understood the cornmeal example until now. I used the leftover dough from the circles and made fun shaped layers for kids. Thanks!

Sarah | Broma Bakery
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Fantastic! Hope you enjoy, Jean!!

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Michael Smith, a Canadian tv. chef, uses a hand grater for easy blending of cold fat into flour – I haven’t had a problem with achieving cornmeal consistency since I watched his program, alas no longer in production but he has some great books out

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I use a pastry cutter to incorporate my butter Cristo into the flour mixture. I also keep powdered buttermilk on hand and use that. I don’t add sugar unless I am making raisin cinnamon or shortcake out of the recipe. I use this basic recipe with changes to make short cake for fruit, cinnamon raisin with glaze, Biscuits or garlic cheesy Biscuits to name a few. You can make a quick Indian fry bread in the skillet too. My go to recipe.

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I am making these for thanksgiving but trying to prep as much as possible. Will they be ok if I make the dough and cut out biscuits, refrigerate and cook them the next day?

Sarah | Broma Bakery
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Yes, but freeze them!

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