Pistachio macarons with a white chocolate pistachio ganache. Zomg.

Last month I was invited to Israel by Vibe Israel and it was one of the best trips of my life (if you haven’t seen Part 1 of my trip, The Foodie’s Guide To Israel, check it out here!).

My favorite aspect of the trip (besides eating delicious food) was engaging in personal experiences with the local people. We were invited to Shabbat dinner at the most wonderful family’s home in Tel Aviv, we ate freshly baked Yemeni bread in a small hillside town outside of Jerusalem, and for a whole day we got paired up for a one-on-one with experts in our fields.

My expert was a seriously amazing pastry chef named Alon Shabo. I had heard great things about Alon prior to meeting him; he was friendly, talented, and a total sweetheart. But I didn’t imagine getting along as well as we did.

We met our mentors-for-the-day in the morning in the hotel lobby. I’m not sure if I saw Alon’s face or he saw mine first, but we instantly ran to each other and bear hugged. He said he was so excited to meet me, and I was like me?! I’m so excited to meet YOU!

Pistachio macarons with a white chocolate pistachio ganache. Zomg.

Pistachio macarons with a white chocolate pistachio ganache. Zomg.

Alon radiated a warmth that was genuine and comfortable. He felt like the brother I never had. I was so excited to spend the day together.

After a delicious breakfast with the group, we walked across the city to a neighborhood called Florentin, known for it’s market-like streets filled with vendors of every food imaginable. We sampled marzipan (sweet almond paste), burekas (a savory cheesy pastry), and halva (fudge-like tahini candy).

Alon told me about his background as a pastry chef and how though he used to work in kitchens, he found it stressful. So he started working as a pastry consultant full-time, and he now creates desserts for some of the best restaurants in Tel Aviv.

One of Alon’s favorite things to make is macarons, so we went back to his house to do some baking together. He asked, “how do you feel about pistachio?” I shouted, a little too eager, “OH IT’S MY FAVORITE!”

After bonding for five minutes over our love of pistachio (pistachio ice cream is the 8th wonder of the world), we set to work.

I’ve always been terrified of macarons. I’m not a classically-trained baker. I’ve learned a lot through the years, but my technical knowledge of pastry pales in comparison to Alon’s. Though he gave me things to do, I kept peering over at the way he worked, so skillfully and effortlessly.

Pistachio macarons with a white chocolate pistachio ganache. Zomg.

Pistachio macarons with a white chocolate pistachio ganache. Zomg.

He showed me a technique that I had never seen in American macaron-making before. Instead of making a French meringue (uncooked egg whites) you make a Swiss meringue (warmed egg whites). The result? A much more stable base for otherwise finicky macarons.

This base is also more forgiving when it comes to the folding stage. Instead of painstakingly counting the number of times you fold the almond meal into the egg whites, you mix everything in a stand mixer. Of course you still have to watch the batter like a hawk, but it comes together in a flash.

Then there’s the white chocolate pistachio ganache in the middle. Omg, this was SO delicious. And once again, so simple. I love that about recipes from classically trained pastry chefs: they know how to do things efficiently.

Pistachio macarons with a white chocolate pistachio ganache. Zomg.

Our macarons were delicious. And just like that, my time with Alon was over. After about seven hugs and twelve thank you‘s later, I went back to my hotel.

Walking the streets of Tel Aviv, I felt refreshed. It was invigorating to meet such a talented, yet humble human being. Someone who welcomed my into their home and made me feel so instantly at ease. Someone who made a damn good macaron.

Pistachio macarons with a white chocolate pistachio ganache. Zomg.

The final recipe I’m sharing with you all differs slightly from Alon’s. I used a little more egg white, so the recipe makes for 3 egg whites total. I seriously recommend getting a kitchen scale for macarons. I have this scale and it was only $12!

And honestly because I enjoyed baking with Alon so much, if you ever make it to Tel Aviv, he hosts private pastry classes in his home and I cannot recommend a better thing to do. I just googled his name and cooking class, and found a list of classes here. And if you have further questions don’t hesitate to ask me and I can point you in the right direction.

XO!

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White Chocolate Pistachio Macarons

Pistachio macarons with a white chocolate pistachio ganache. Zomg.
  • Author: Sarah Fennel
  • Yield: 30 macarons 1x
Scale

Ingredients

for the macarons

  • 100g egg whites
  • 100g granulated sugar
  • 100g almond flour
  • 100g powdered sugar
  • 2 tablespoons pistachio paste
  • green food coloring (optional)
  • pinch of sea salt, for garnish (optional)

for the pistachio white chocolate ganache

  • 100g heavy cream
  • 250g good quality white chocolate
  • 2 tablespoons pistachio paste
  • green food coloring (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 300°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Set aside.
  2. Heat a small pot of water over medium heat until it steams. In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine egg whites and granulated sugar. Place bowl over steaming pot, creating a double boiler.
  3. Whisk egg whites and sugar until sugar melts completely and egg whites become white and frothy, 1 to 1.5 minutes. Remove from heat and place bowl back onto standing mixer.
  4. Fit standing mixer with whisk attachment and whisk on high speed for 2-3 minutes, until stiff peaks form. Congratulations, you just made a Swiss meringue!
  5. Sift together almond flour and powdered sugar, then gently shake into meringue bowl. Drizzle in pistachio paste and green food coloring (if using).
  6. Place bowl onto stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment. Turn mixer to medium speed and whisk for 10 seconds. Stop mixer and use a spatula to scoop up some of the batter. If you can make a figure-eight with the dripping batter without the batter breaking, you can stop. But most likely you will need another 5-10 seconds. So repeat process, and try the figure-eight again. The best way to describe the perfect consistency is like slow moving lava. It should give, but only slightly, like in slow-motion.
  7. Once your batter is the correct consistency, scoop it into a large pastry bag fitted with a 1 inch tip. Pipe silver dollar-sized circles onto prepared baking sheets, keeping about 1.5 inches between each meringue. Bang baking sheet on counter two times to remove any air bubbles. Sprinkle tops with a little sea salt as a garnish.
  8. Here’s the fun part: you don’t need to let them air dry. Just pop them into the prepared oven for 13 minutes, turning around halfway through, then allow to cool completely before removing from baking sheets.
  9. While the macarons are baking, make the ganache. In a small microwave-safe bowl, microwave the heavy cream for 45 seconds. Remove, then stir in white chocolate, pistachio paste, and green food coloring (if using).
  10. Scoop mixture into a piping bag fitted with a 1/2 inch tip, and place in the fridge to harden (about 20 minutes).
  11. Once you’re ready, pipe the ganache onto a macaron and sandwich with another macaron. Repeat with all macarons.

Vibe Israel invited me for a week in Israel, though I was not compensated in any way. All opinions are 100% my own. Thank you for supporting the companies and brands that make Broma possible!

68 comments

Ruth
Reply

these look amazing. where do you find pistachio paste? a good one, not one just made with sugar.

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Hi Ruth! Great question. I ground my own in a food processor from unsalted pistachio nutmeats. 🙂

little black domicle blogger
Reply

Well now I know there is a difference between cold and warm egg whites! Just teasing you a bit. We have your first post of this trip saved because once again the relationship between food and color is a huge inspiration for us. -Laurel Bledsoe

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Thank you so much! It was such a fantastic, colorful place. I loved every minute of it.

Aliza
Reply

Why do you not wait for the macarons to dry?

Sofi | Broma Bakery
Reply

Hey Aliza! You could wait, but because the base is so stable there’s no need to add an extra half hour of drying time!

Sarah | Well and Full
Reply

It looks like your macaron education paid off- these look absolutely perfect! What an amazing opportunity to learn how to make them. Still though, I don’t know if I could muster up the courage to make macarons… I’m such a terrible baker!!

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

It’s scary for sure. But you just have to watch a bunch of videos and then take the plunge! You can do it girlfriend!

Lauren Grant | Zestful Kitchen
Reply

these are absolutely stunning! I can almost taste them! Plus, now I really want to take one of Alon’s classes!

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Right? I want to go back just to take one 🙂

Meredith | Earth & Oven
Reply

These are SOOO epic! In beauty and deliciousness. I love all of your israel inspo posts- thanks for sharing 🙂

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

My pleasure! It was such a wonderful experience, I love being able to share it with others!

Laura (A Beautiful Plate)
Reply

These are stunning and perfect Sarah!!! and the writing is wonderful. loved reading about your experience in Israel. and definitely bookmarking that tip about the meringue too 😉

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Thank you so much girlfriend!

Debs
Reply

These macs look perfect Sarah! In the pastry kitchen I work in we use an Italian meringue and it’s super forgiving. I’ve had to make hundreds in a day before and I would definitely get you helping if you lived closer! Stunning!

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

That makes SO much sense, Debs. I honestly don’t know why more macaron recipes don’t call for a cooked meringue. It’s so weird!

Emilee
Reply

I can’t wait to try this!! Seems like such a time saver from the other methods! If you were going to make plain macarons would you simply omit the pistachio paste without any other changes? Thank you!

Sofi | Broma Bakery
Reply

Exactly! We have a bunch of other recipes on the blog for macarons using this method too without pistachio paste like s’mores macarons 🙂

Lindsay
Reply

These are so perfectly beautiful! The colors are so lovely and they look so airy and light 🙂 I loved reading about your trip to isreal….it got me on a major travel obsession!

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Right? I want to go back so badly!

Ashley
Reply

Every time you talk about your trip I get a strong urge to pack my bags and travel somewhere new. those memories last forever, especially when they involve incredible food 😉 It’s been forever since I have made macarons, but it’s always worth it! Where do you buy pistachio paste? can you recommend a brand?

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Right? Traveling is one of the best parts of life. And I ground my own pistachios into a paste in a food processor, so I suggest that. It’s super easy!

Gaby Dalkin
Reply

These are absolutely adorable!!

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Thank you! I just love macs 🙂

Renée
Reply

These look amazing and I cannot wait to try the recipe! Question, is there a step missing to whip the egg whites/sugar into stiff peaks after the double boiler step? i wanted to check before testing it out. Thank you! 🙂

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Oh my goodness you are right Renee! My apologies! The recipe is now updated.

Renée
Reply

Thank you so much for the update! Can’t wait to try out the recipe! 🙂

Joanne Bruno
Reply

Okay, I NEED to try this macaron method because my macs either turn out perfectly or as a total hot mess. And totally agree that pistachio anything is the best!

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Right? It made macarons SO easy! You must 🙂

Julie
Reply

Definitely going to make these. They look amazing! One question though, how did you make the pistachio paste? I searched online for some pistachio paste recipes and they are all different.

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

I ground my own from pistachio nuts in a small food processor 🙂

Angie
Reply

These are beautiful! any tips for making macrons at a higher altitude?!

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

I do not know any myself, but I’m sure there are tons of tutorials out there online!

Julie
Reply

Made these today. They didn’t have feet and didn’t look that great but they turned out delicious!

Susan Conley @ Cookthestone
Reply

looks fantastic!!!1 I really need this macarons to satisfy my sweet tooth!!! ?

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

They are the perfect way to satisfy a sweet tooth!

Leslie Smith
Reply

Why can’t I pin this??!!

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

I’m not sure, it’s probably a problem with your browser!

Maya
Reply

Hello! I’m hoping to make these for my boyfriend for his birthday, but I’m trying to cut down on everything I have to do the night I bake them (following a long and late work day). Do you think I could make the ganache filling the night before and keep it refrigerated until it’s time to assemble?

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Hi Maya! Actually, macarons are best on the second day (the cookie becomes less crunchy, which is good for macarons), so I would make these the day before and store them in an airtight container 🙂

Jenny
Reply

Hi! these are absolutely gorgeous!! can I ask what green did you use? sorry if you already answered this questions.
Thanks!
jenny

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Hi Jenny! Do you mean green food coloring? I used the standard green that comes in the r/y/g/b food coloring packets! If you want them to look a little less bright, you can also add in a teaspoon or so of molasses 🙂

Tonya Zinter
Reply

How do grams convert to our measurements?

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Hi Tonya! I’m honestly not sure, because for macarons I’ve found that using grams is essential to a macaron’s success. You can get a scale easily online, or you can do conversions online, though it won’t be as accurate!

HANIYA KHAN
Reply

tHIS METHOD IS SO MUCH MORE SIMPLER! NO MORE CRYING ABOUT HOW SUCKY MY MACARONS LOOK!

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Right?! It’s crazy that it hasn’t caught on!

Bernice Baran
Reply

Hi Sarah! I’ve been trying different methods and ratios of macarons to see which one will give me the most consistent results and one day they’re perfect and most days they’re awful! I’m so glad you shared this because until now I haven’t even heard of the Swiss method but ohmyyyyygooodddnessss I will NEVER try the Italian or French methods again! I have never had macarons turn out so beautiful and who would’ve thought with such a simple recipe! HUGE THANK YOU !!!

Josie
Reply

Hi!! I recently made this macrons and they were a hit 🙂 however I just got the KitchenAid, the one you lift the bowl, because my other one broke (tilt head). When I went to make them with they new one they cracked, any ideas of what I could you?? Love you page and your trip sounds amazing!!!!!!

Lisa
Reply

Sounds lovely! I like my macarons to have a chewy texture with a crisp outside. Do these cone out that way? Bouchon Bakery has some if the best with the texture I like.

Sarah | Broma Bakery
Reply

Absolutely. They have the signature outside crunch with a chewy bite.
Hope this helps 🙂

Stephanie
Reply

Mine didn’t have feet but other than that they were perfect! Any idea what happened?

Sofi Llanso
Reply

Hey Stephanie! Oh no–macarons can be so finicky it’s hard to know what can cause those annoying things like no feet. Often this happens because your batter was too wet. This could be because you under measured your dry ingredients, it was a humid or rainy day, your almond meal had more moisture in it than usual…the list goes on. If you’re only problem was no feet (honestly a huge feat in my opinion), it was probably just the amount of moisture. Try letting your macarons dry out before putting them in the oven or try them out on a super dry day!

Amy
Reply

Can you please provide more information about the pistachio paste please? How do you make it? Are you using the salted or unsalted kind? Can you provide a quick recipe? Just writing “pistachio paste” is very vague.

Sofi | Broma Bakery
Reply

Hey Amy!

Pistachio paste is a product that you can buy at a specialty store usually! It’s kind of like almond past. You can also make your by simply grinding unsalted, shelled pistachios in a high power blender–kind of like making homemade peanut butter!

Hope this helps 🙂

Esther
Reply

Hi. I am about to attempt these macarons and I had a quick question. The instructions say to drizzle in the pistachio paste, but I made my own pistachio paste (from raw, shelled, and skinned pistachios) and it is super thick. Like play-doh thick. Is it supposed to be thinner?

Sofi | Broma Bakery
Reply

Hey Esther! The pistachio paste we buy (or when we’ve made it homemade just like you did!) is usually the consistency of a natural almond butter. Thick, but still liquidy! You could try heating up your paste just a little bit to get it moving before adding into your batter! Hope this helps!

Julie L Allen
Reply

So I’ve made this recipe a few times. Any suggestions for why they might be hollow inside?

Sofi | Broma Bakery
Reply

Hey Julie! Macarons can be so tricky. Make sure you’re not overmixing your batter. Once everything comes together and forms a figure 8 without breaking stop mixing! Also make sure you’re baking at the lowest heat possible (sometimes ovens can be weird) to ensures your macarons don’t puff out and dry out too quickly! Hope this helps 🙂

Zainub
Reply

Hi, just wanted to know what should the meringue syrup be heated to before it is whipped ?

Ken
Reply

I tweaked your recipe to make raspberry macrons. The result was exceptional. The Swiss meringue makes the difference. The batter seems much more forgiving with this recipe than other methods. Thanks for publishing it.

Sofi | Broma Bakery
Reply

Oh YAY! We are so happy to hear these worked out for you. Enjoy the macarons 🙂

Ezra
Reply

They look delicious😋 What is your food coloring brand?

Sofi | Broma Bakery
Reply

Thank you! We honestly use them all haha. I prefer gel food coloring so it doesn’t change the consistency of your batter!

Kimberly
Reply

I’ve made a lot of plain macarons but I had some leftover pistachio paste and have always wanted to try these. Your recipe looked the best to me and was one of the only ones to use pistachio paste instead of flour. However, I am pretty religious when it comes to certain parts of the macaron-making process (they’re so finicky that one small deviation can send them in the trash!)..so when I saw instructions to just toss it all together and whisk it with a stand mixer instead of the usual macronage technique, I got a little scared! Is it because I’m using a Swiss Meringue? Just curious. Either way I’m going to follow your lead so here goes nothing…!!

Sofi | Broma Bakery
Reply

Exactly–it’s just a different method 🙂 Both will work out!

Jay
Reply

HI,

If I wanted to omit the pistachio paste (still use the Swiss method), would the ingredient amounts change, say for a vanilla macaron?

Thank you.

Sofi | Broma Bakery
Reply

No keep it the same! Sorry for the late reply 🙂

Naki
Reply

Thank you! I tried this recipe and it came out great! Tried other ones before and didn’t turn out so well not sure why haha. But this one definitely works for me so thank you again for this recipe! I didn’t use pistachios but still turned out great!

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